This Day in History

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Wednesday, August 11, 1943

In the 1940s, as a result of the Second World War, South Africa was undergoing a downturn in economic fortunes. Unemployment and food shortages were rife, exacerbating this economic depression for the working and lower classes specifically. The 1940s saw the growth of community based organizations as well as the involvement of women in politics, who were mobilising for bread and butter issues – politicising the provision of basic needs.

This article was produced for South African History Online on 08-Jun-2017

This Day in History Extra Dates
  • Wednesday, August 11, 2004
    Kenyan writer Ngugi wa Thiong'o and his wife are attacked by armed men in the capital Nairobi.
    References:
    • BBC, (2004). 'Key Dates', Focus on Africa, October to December, v. 15 no. 4, p. 8

  • Wednesday, August 11, 2004
    Home Affairs Minister Nosiviwe Mapisa-Nqakula meets British officials amid concerns about false SA passports discovered during anti-terror operations. The meetings are expected to continue until the end of the week and also concern improving cooperation between the two immigration services.
    References:
    • The Citizen, 12 August 2004, p. 4

  • Sunday, August 11, 2002
    Clashes among local militias, a rebel group and the Ugandan army kills at least ninety people. The victims, many of whom had been hacked to death, included women and children.
    References:

  • Sunday, August 11, 2002
    Clare Short insists the Earth Summit in Johannesburg was primarily about tackling Third World poverty rather than environmental issues.
  • Saturday, August 11, 2001
    Roman Catholic Archbishop Emmanuel Milingo of Zambia, who in May married Maria Sung in a ceremony performed by the Unification Church, agrees to renounce his marriage and return to the Catholic Church after the Vatican threatened to excommunicate him.
    References:

  • Wednesday, August 11, 1999
    The last solar eclipse of the millennium casts a shadow extending from Land's End at the south-western tip of England to the Bay of Bengal near India. The moon's shadow darkens parts of Europe, Africa and Asia.
    References:

  • Tuesday, August 11, 1998
    Congolese rebels fighting President Laurent Kabila say they are closing in on the capital, while the government rounds up Tutsis, suspected of supporting the rebellion.
    References:

  • Tuesday, August 11, 1998
    Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat arrives in Cape Town on his first state visit to SA.
    References:
    • Wallis, F. (2000). Nuusdagboek: feite en fratse oor 1000 jaar, Kaapstad: Human & Rousseau

  • Sunday, August 11, 1996
    Members of People Against Gangsterism and Drugs (PAGAD) attend a rally in Cape Town. Similar rallies were held in Durban and Johannesburg's Lenasia area, and national support grows.
    References:
    • Kalley, J.A.; Schoeman, E. & Andor, L.E. (eds)(1999). Southern African Political History: a chronology of key political events from independence to mid-1997, Westport: Greenwood

  • Wednesday, August 11, 1993
    UN forces kill seven Somali gunmen who shot at a surveillance helicopter, as militias of warlord Mohammed Farah Aidid intensify an offensive against peacekeepers.
    References:

  • Wednesday, August 11, 1993
    The second draft of the Interim Constitution is tabled, giving exclusive powers to regions.
    References:

  • Tuesday, August 11, 1992
    SA signs air services agreement with United Kingdom.
    References:
    • Kalley, J.A.; Schoeman, E. & Andor, L.E. (eds)(1999). Southern African Political History: a chronology of key political events from independence to mid-1997, Westport: Greenwood

  • Sunday, August 11, 1991
    Nineteen residents are killed in an attack from Mandela hostel.
    References:
    • Coleman, M. (ed)(1998). A Crime Against Humanity: analysing the repression of the apartheid state, Johannesburg: Human Rights Committee, p. 267.

  • Sunday, August 11, 1991
    Ismail Mohamed is appointed as the first Black judge of SA.
    References:
    • Wallis, F. (2000). Nuusdagboek: feite en fratse oor 1000 jaar, Kaapstad: Human & Rousseau
    •  https://www.news24.com

  • Saturday, August 11, 1990
    Egyptian and Moroccan troops land in Saudi Arabia to prevent Iraqi invasion.
  • Saturday, August 11, 1990
    Nine people are killed and ten wounded in an attack on a Sebokeng hostel.
    References:

  • Saturday, August 11, 1990
    Thirteen people are injured, some seriously, when a bomb explodes in a building housing a fast food outlet in Pretoria. Police defuse a second device at a nearby taxi rank.
    References:

  • Friday, August 11, 1989
    Eric Gumede, Youth League activist, is shot dead in KwaMashu one week after release from detention.
    References:
    • Coleman, M. (ed)(1998). A Crime Against Humanity: analysing the repression of the apartheid state, Johannesburg: Human Rights Committee, p. 250.

  • Thursday, August 11, 1988
    Six Fijian rugby players and a radio commentator are banned by the Fijian Rugby Union for travelling to South Africa. The seven left Fiji the previous week to join the aborted World XV tour of South Africa.
    References:

  • Sunday, August 11, 1985
    Twenty-three residents are killed in police action during a protest in Duncan Village, East London.
    References:
    • Coleman, M. (ed)(1998). A Crime Against Humanity: analysing the repression of the apartheid state, Johannesburg: Human Rights Committee, p. 263.

  • Wednesday, August 11, 1982
    The South African government has released details of a South African Defence Force (SADF) raid into Southern Angola. Between two and three hundred South West African People's Organisation (SWAPO) fighters are believed killed, with upwards of another hundred injured at a forward base in the Cambeno Valley. A significant amount of equipment was also captured and destroyed, including rations originally obtained from the UN High Commission for Refugees.
  • Wednesday, August 11, 1976
    A number of student leaders at the University of the Western Cape and other community leaders are arrested and detained at Victor Verster prison, near Paarl.

  • Monday, August 11, 1975
    Decisions on the future constitution of the Transkei are agreed upon at a meeting of a Cabinet committee of the South African and Transkei governments, presided over by Prime Minister John Vorster in Pretoria.
    References:
    • Kalley, J.A.; Schoeman, E. & Andor, L.E. (eds)(1999). Southern African Political History: a chronology of key political events from independence to mid-1997, Westport: Greenwood

  • Sunday, August 11, 1974
    SA international acclaimed swimmer and world record holder, Penny Heyns, is born. This date might be wrong. Several sources give it as 8 November 1974.
  • Saturday, August 11, 1973
    Blanche Gerstman (83), composer and musician who also lectured in composition in Pretoria and Cape Town, dies in Cape Town. Verwey: New Dictionary of South African Biography).
    References:
    • Wallis, F. (2000). Nuusdagboek: feite en fratse oor 1000 jaar, Kaapstad: Human & Rousseau

  • Friday, August 11, 1972
    The Minister of Bantu Administration and Development declares that no more land will be allocated to the 'homelands' other than that stipulated in the 1936 Land Act.
    References:
    • Kalley, J.A.; Schoeman, E. & Andor, L.E. (eds)(1999). Southern African Political History: a chronology of key political events from independence to mid-1997, Westport: Greenwood

  • Thursday, August 11, 1966
    Mark Williams, SA soccer player, is born.
    References:
    • Wallis, F. (2000). Nuusdagboek: feite en fratse oor 1000 jaar, Kaapstad: Human & Rousseau

  • Sunday, August 11, 1963
    Harold Wolpe, a listed Communist   arrested on the Bechuanaland border, and Arthur Goldreich, caught in the Rivonia raid escape from the Johannesburg Central Police station, 'go to ground' and on 28 August emerge in Bechuanaland.
    References:
    • Kalley, J.A.; Schoeman, E. & Andor, L.E. (eds)(1999). Southern African Political History: a chronology of key political events from independence to mid-1997, Westport: Greenwood

  • Thursday, August 11, 1960
    Chad, formally known as Tchad and the first of four territories, which had formed French Equatorial Africa, achieves independence with François Tombalbaye as president.
  • Monday, August 11, 1952
    Prince Hussein is proclaimed King Hussein of Jordan on termination of King Talal's reign.
    References:

  • Friday, August 11, 1950
    Three students from Johannesburg are the first to climb Devil's Tooth in the Drakensberg Range.
    References:
    • Wallis, F. (2000). Nuusdagboek: feite en fratse oor 1000 jaar, Kaapstad: Human & Rousseau

  • Sunday, August 11, 1946
    The Stellenbosch Music Society is founded.
    References:
    • Swart: Afrikaanse Kultuuralmanak

  • Sunday, August 11, 1940
    World War 2: North Africa. A week before Mussolini orders General Rodolfo Graziani to invade Egypt from Libya, the British RAF raids airfields and Italian military bases.
  • Sunday, August 11, 1940
    Hendrik Pieter Nicolaas Muller, ethnologist, traveller, consul-general for the Orange Free State in the Netherlands and receiver of an honorary doctorate of literature from the University of South Africa in 1931, dies in the Hague, the Netherlands.
    References:
    • Potgieter, D.J. et al. (eds)(1970). Standard Encyclopaedia of Southern Africa, Cape Town: NASOU, v. 7, p. 639

  • Friday, August 11, 1939
    Engela Elizabeth Helena van Rooyen, SA novelist who also writes under her married name as Engela Linde, is born.
    References:
    • Wallis, F. (2000). Nuusdagboek: feite en fratse oor 1000 jaar, Kaapstad: Human & Rousseau

  • Sunday, August 11, 1935
    Lofty Nel, SA rugby player, is born.
    References:
    • Wallis, F. (2000). Nuusdagboek: feite en fratse oor 1000 jaar, Kaapstad: Human & Rousseau

  • Saturday, August 11, 1934
    The chimes at the Union Buildings is broadcasted before the early morning new bulletins of the South African Broadcasting Corporation (SABC).
    References:
    • ---, (2005). 'Pretoria 1855-2005: Chronologie 1798-1935', Bylaag tot Rekord.

  • Tuesday, August 11, 1925
    Cassim Mohammed Bassa, estate agent and community leader, is born in India.   He was president of the Natal Indian Blind and Deaf Society from 1966 and also president of the South African Table Tennis Board. His condemnation of apartheid in sports led to the withdrawing of his passport for many years.
    References:
    • Verwey: New Dictionary of South African Biography

  • Sunday, August 11, 1912
    Sultan Mulai Hafid of Morocco abdicates.
    References:
    • Wallis, F. (2000). Nuusdagboek: feite en fratse oor 1000 jaar, Kaapstad: Human & Rousseau

  • Wednesday, August 11, 1909
    Marthinus Versfeld, SA philosopher and author, is born.
    References:
    • Wallis, F. (2000). Nuusdagboek: feite en fratse oor 1000 jaar, Kaapstad: Human & Rousseau

  • Saturday, August 11, 1906
    Professor Daniël Wilhelmus Kruger, historian and professor at the Potchefstroom University for Christian Higher Education, University of South Africa, University of Fort Hare and University of Transkei, is born in Steynsburg, Karoo.
    References:
    • Swart: Afrikaanse Kultuuralmanak

  • Thursday, August 11, 1904
    Prof. Pieter de Villiers Pienaar, Afrikaans linguist and cultural historian, is born.
    References:
    • Wallis, F. (2000). Nuusdagboek: feite en fratse oor 1000 jaar, Kaapstad: Human & Rousseau

  • Thursday, August 11, 1904
    Herero Revolt:  The Waterberg battle begins. The fighting takes place mainly at the areas southeast of the Waterberg (Klein Hamakari and Hamakari (Ohamakari).There are great losses on both sides. The heaviest fighting occurs at the Hamakari waterhole. In connection with this date, the following source mentions:  "German General Lothar von Trotha defeated the Herero tribe near Waterberg, South Africa."
  • Saturday, August 11, 1900
    Anglo-Boer War 2: The Mounted Brigade under Lord Dundonald enters Ermelo unopposed.
    References:
    • Cloete: The Anglo-Boer War: a chronology

  • Sunday, August 11, 1872
    Sir Andrew Smith (74), discoverer and first director of the South African Museum, dies in London.
    References:
    • Wallis, F. (2000). Nuusdagboek: feite en fratse oor 1000 jaar, Kaapstad: Human & Rousseau

  • Friday, August 11, 1871
    Basutoland is annexed to the Cape.
    References:

  • Thursday, August 11, 1825
    The first directors' meeting of Albany Shipping is held in Port Frances (later Port Alfred), eastern Cape.
    References:
    • Wallis, F. (2000). Nuusdagboek: feite en fratse oor 1000 jaar, Kaapstad: Human & Rousseau

  • Sunday, August 11, 1771
    Ryk Tulbach, Cape governor in whose honour the town Tulbach was named, dies in the Cape.
    References:
    • Wallis, F. (2000). Nuusdagboek: feite en fratse oor 1000 jaar, Kaapstad: Human & Rousseau

  • Friday, August 11, 1595
    Cornelis de Houtman lands at Mossel Bay, nine days after rounding the Cape, and barters sheep and cattle from the Hottentots (Khoi-Khoi). Date is given as 4 August 1594 by Potgieter, (1970).
    References:
    • Wallis, F. (2000). Nuusdagboek: feite en fratse oor 1000 jaar, Kaapstad: Human & Rousseau
    •  Potgieter, D.J. et al. (eds)(1970). Standard Encyclopaedia of Southern Africa, Cape Town: NASOU, v. 5, p. 640